Continuing Education, Environmental Health, Industrial Hygiene, Occupational Health, Occupational Health Nursing, safety and health, Uncategorized

Pesticide Exposure & Health – Wednesday, June 20th in Oakland, CA

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Join COEH-CE on Wednesday, June 20th, in Oakland, CA for a half-day course on Pesticide Exposure & Health: Protecting Agricultural Communities.

Register
Agenda, Speakers, and more information here

 

About the Course:

Exposure to pesticides has been linked to a wide variety of short-term and long-term health effects. This course will explore the relationship between pesticides and Parkinson’s disease, residential proximity to insecticides and fumigants with neurodevelopment, and associations between insecticide exposure and neurodevelopment in children.

Learners will review findings from The Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas (CHAMACOS) study, a birth cohort study conducted in the agricultural Salinas Valley of California. Learners will also review case studies that demonstrate how state pesticide and labor laws and regulations are designed to prevent exposure to pesticides, and will identify areas of improvement to protect agricultural workers from pesticide exposure.

 

About the Instructors:

Anne Katten, MPH – Anne Katten is an industrial hygienist. She has worked with California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation for over 25 years. Her work includes analysis of pesticide illness episode investigations, pesticide risk assessments and regulatory proposals and advocating for improved enforcement and policy changes to reduce farmworkers exposure to pesticides and other work hazards. Earlier in her career she worked as a research assistant at a seed company.

Samuel Goldman, MD, MPH – Dr. Goldman received his medical degree from the University of Texas, Houston in 1987. He trained in Preventive Medicine and earned a Master of Public Health in Environmental Health Science from the University of California, Berkeley in 1993. He is an Associate Clinical Professor at the University of California, San Francisco in the Division of Occupational & Environmental Medicine and the Department of Neurology, and is an attending physician in the Environmental Medicine clinic at the San Francisco VA Medical Center. Dr. Goldman has published extensively on the epidemiology of neurodegenerative diseases, with a focus on environmental risk factors. Among these are pesticides, solvents, smoking and traumatic brain injury, and the interaction of these risk factors with genetic susceptibility factors.

Robert Gunier, PhD – Dr. Gunier is currently an assistant researcher at the Center for Environmental research and Children’s Health (CERCH) in the School of Public Health at UC Berkeley. He received his MPH and PhD in environmental health sciences from UC Berkeley. Dr. Gunier has worked for 20 years conducting exposure assessment and epidemiological analyses for studies of children’s environmental health including birth outcomes, neurodevelopment, respiratory function and cancer. He previously worked at the California Department of Public Health in the Environmental Health Investigations Branch.

Click here to learn more & register

Environmental Health, Occupational Health, Uncategorized

12th Summer Institute on Migration and Global Health

Summer Institute on Migration and Global Health 

Are you curious about the latest public policies on migrant and refugee health? Do you want to learn more about research on vulnerable populations? Are you interested in health care services for migrants? If your answer was yes to any of the previous questions, then the Summer Institute on Migration and Global Health is the perfect event for you!

Taking place in Oakland, California, on June 1821, this four-day-long event will give you access to insights from worldwide national and international recognized experts who will teach the relationship between migration and global health from a diverse array of perspectives. This will be a great opportunity for researchers, students and professionals to learn about various health issues affecting mobile populations, and to create new professional networks.

Space is limited!
Register HERE 
Uncategorized

December 2017: COEH in the Media

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John Balmes is quoted on Atlanta’s Channel 11: Near a Wildfire? Not Every Mask Will Help Keep Out Harmful Pollutants.

Gina Solomon is quoted in Chemical Watch: Proposition 65: Reducing the Burden?

Kirk Smith is quoted in the Seminole State College Newsroom: Engineering Hope: Students, Faculty Developing Life-Saving Indoor Air Quality Solutions in Peru.

Marc Schenker is quoted in the Desert Sun: Unions Hope to Recruit California Cannabis Workers, But Federal Regulations Could Get in the Way.

Uncategorized

Cal/OSHA Issues Advisory for Worker Safety in Wildfire Regions

News Release No.: 2017-114
December 6, 2017

Oakland—Cal/OSHA is advising employers that special precautions must be taken to protect workers from hazards from wildfire smoke.

Smoke from wildfires contains chemicals, gases and fine particles that can harm health. The greatest hazard comes from breathing fine particles, which can reduce lung function, worsen asthma and other existing heart and lung conditions, and cause coughing, wheezing and difficulty breathing.

Cal/OSHA has posted materials that provide guidance for employers and workers on working safely in conditions with heavy smoke caused by the wildfires. Employers with operations exposed to wildfire smoke must consider taking appropriate measures as part of their Injury and Illness Prevention Program under Title 8 section 3203 of the California Code of Regulations and as required under section 5141 (Control of Harmful Exposure to Employees). Those measures include:

  • Engineering controls whenever feasible (for example, using a filtered ventilation system in indoor work areas)
  • Administrative controls if practicable (for example, limiting the time that employees work outdoors)
  • Providing workers with respiratory protective equipment, such as disposable filtering facepieces (dust masks).
    • To filter out fine particles, respirators must be labeled N-95, N-99, N-100, R-95, P-95, P-99, or P-100, and must be labeled approved by the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
    • Approved respiratory protective equipment is necessary for employees working in outdoor locations designated by local air quality management districts as “Very Unhealthy,” “Unhealthy” or “Hazardous.”
      • It takes more effort to breathe through a respirator, and it can increase the risk of heat stress. Frequent breaks are advised. Workers feeling dizzy, faint or nauseous are advised to go to a clean area, remove the respirator and seek medical attention.
      • Respirators should be discarded if they become difficult to breathe through or if the inside becomes dirty.

Cal/OSHA helps protect workers from health and safety hazards on the job in almost every workplace in California. Cal/OSHA’s Consultation Services Branch provides free and voluntary assistance to employers to improve their health and safety programs. Employers should call (800) 963-9424 for assistance from Cal/OSHA Consultation Services.

Employees with work-related questions or complaints may contact DIR’s Call Center in English or Spanish at 844-LABOR-DIR (844-522-6734). The California Workers’ Information line at 866-924-9757 provides recorded information in English and Spanish on a variety of work-related topics. Complaints can also be filed confidentially with Cal/OSHA district offices.

Members of the press may contact Erika Monterroza or Peter Melton at (510) 286-1161, and are encouraged to subscribe to get email alerts on DIR’s press releases or other departmental updates.